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The extra and often spoken "Choo" after a stifle!


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Today, I want to address the issue of the extra and often spoken (or whispered) "Choo" at the end of a sneeze, which most often occurs when females sneeze. Just to clarify, I am referring to situations when a girl or woman will stifle her sneeze almost completely, and the sneeze seems like it will be virtually silent, but then she will either speak or whisper an almost fake sounding "choo!" right afterwards. (Sometimes it will be after a few seconds delay, making it seem even more fake). Of course, for some girls the "choo" might actually be very loud and extra feminine, but it still seems fake and unnessasary and comes after an obviously stifled sneeze. The question many of us have always asked is, why do some people stifle and then go out of their way to attract attention to their sneeze by doing the extra "Choo!" at the end.

Well, here's an interesting observation. I have 2 girls in my workplace that both stifle their sneezes by pinching their noses shut, and they sneeze almost silently. The first girl makes a quiet little buildup noise like "Hup...", then the sneeze is totally silent and she just quietly and slowly exhales with no sound. The second girl doesn't make any buildup noise, then she stifles the sneeze itself, and a couple of seconds later just casually says the word "Choo". Sometimes she'll even say something after that like "Oh, my goodness" or "Uhhhh!"

The really interesting thing is that other employees who have witnessed the first girl sneezing (who doesn't say "Choo" after the sneeze) have made comments to her about how she should let her sneezes come out and not hold them in because it can be harmful to do that. Some even asked if that was a sneeze, because it sounded wierd. On the other hand, those same employess have witnessed the second girl sneezing (who says the "Choo" at the end), and none of them have ever said anything to her about not stifling. In fact, I once commented to her about not holding her sneezes in (just to get some reactions) and she claimed that she doesn't hold them in. The same people who had lectured the other girl even agreed with her that she is letting her sneezes out. My point here is that perhaps the extra spoken "Choo" at the end of a stifled sneeze somehow helps to VALIDATE the sneeze. In other words, even though the entire force of the sneeze is really being held in, it makes the sneeze seem more like a regular tradional sneeze. Therefore, it makes the sneezes more acceptable to those who witness them, and the sneezes are less likely to draw negative comments about how holding in sneezes isn't good. Any thoughts on this observation???

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The first girl makes a quiet little buildup noise like "Hup...", then the sneeze is totally silent and she just quietly and slowly exhales with no sound.

I do that all the time when I stifle. I suppose if one was listening closely enough it could be construed as a whispered choo. But I don't do it for validation. I just HAVE to exhale after a stifle! :) After reading about all the hate for the choo that follows a stifle around here, I'm super self-conscious about doing it. I try as hard as I can not to let it come out sounding like a choo. Which is stupid because it's not like any of you guys are around when I stifle in the first place. I'm just dumb. I'm leaving now. ^_^

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I think that 90 percent of the time, it's an involuntary thing.

There are, after all, many different types of sneezing.

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If I stifle a sneeze, I have a "breath" afterwards, but it's nothing even remotely close to a "spoken choo." Forgive me, but that is one of my biggest peeves ever in regards to this fetish. I can't stand it when girls do that.

Still, one never hears a man doing it, now do they? I wonder what this says about the guys... :drool: Oddly enough, even though I almost prefer female sneezing over male, I think I might actually find it a bit cute if certain guys did this! Whoo, I'm a walking contradiction! :omg:

~Aku

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hurr, i LOVE the "spoken 'choo'" :lol:

I find it cute, and it gives some sort of sound to stifle.

I love all aspects of a stifle, unless it makes that "squelch" sound :omg: EWWWW!!! :drool::lol:

Never seen a guy speak the choo. But omg, i WISH!! Hrg, hot. :omg:

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Never seen a guy speak the choo. But omg, i WISH!! Hrg, hot. :omg:

I have! I worked with a guy at my old job who did it. He wasn't very hot, though. Kinda old. HUGE beer gut. Actually, never mind... :drool:

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I'm gotta agree with Mr.Sneezy that it's probably involuntary most of the time, but like you I still think that it qualifies as stifling just like the first girl you described (those people at your work place are WRONG! they shouldn't argue with us experts :D )

My theory on the whole male/female issue of spoken choo is that it's deeply embedded in the patriarchy dominated world we live in, but this of course requires further research to back-up ... the only time I've seen a male do it, it was a stand-up comedian faking it on a sketch he did on sneezing (and a great one too if you ask me, even though I overall dislike the guy and the rest of his sense of humor...).

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Very interesting, especially VfP's account of what actually happens from the sneezer#s point of view. If you examine one of the vids that are around showing it, it appears that this is usually a perfectly natural noise. There is an inhalation in the usual way, then the horrible stifling noise, as it might be GNKK! This is intended to prevent the breath being expelled correctly, so the sneezer is left with a lungful of breath which hasn't been let out; moreover the mouth has been in girly sneeze position. The only way of letting the breath out is in a CHOO. Or if you desperately try to avoid it, a silent exhalation, but most people don't have that much control.

However, it is probably true that people feel that a CHOO noise makes a sneeze"real"; there is also the rarer spoken ATISHOO which is obviously intended to be the correct noise for a sneeze.

What is odd is why people should at the same time try to stifle a sneeze and estsablish it as a "real" sneeze. My theory is that they feel it is more polite to make a show of stifling in some manner, even if the result is actually louder, messier, or generally ghastlier than an ordinary sneeze would be.

I don't like stifles at all, but if they really have to be done, I much prefer it if they end with a girly CHOO, to make them a bit more real; unless the high-pitched girly CHOO is very exaggereated; but even then. Of course it's much better if the sneeze gets away and the stifle completely fails.

So, VfP, it seems that not everyone hates the girly CHOO, and , as you say, if you really have to stifle you might as well sneeze in the way that you enjpy most.

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So, VfP, it seems that not everyone hates the girly CHOO, and , as you say, if you really have to stifle you might as well sneeze in the way that you enjpy most.

Thanks, Count. :D But it's not so much a matter of enjoyment. It just comes out that way! I suppose the best solution would be to stop stifling, huh?

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So, VfP, it seems that not everyone hates the girly CHOO, and , as you say, if you really have to stifle you might as well sneeze in the way that you enjpy most.

Thanks, Count. :D But it's not so much a matter of enjoyment. It just comes out that way! I suppose the best solution would be to stop stifling, huh?

I honestly think it would be best! Don't you?

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Today, I want to address the issue of the extra and often spoken (or whispered) "Choo" at the end of a sneeze, which most often occurs when females sneeze. Just to clarify, I am referring to situations when a girl or woman will stifle her sneeze almost completely, and the sneeze seems like it will be virtually silent, but then she will either speak or whisper an almost fake sounding "choo!" right afterwards. (Sometimes it will be after a few seconds delay, making it seem even more fake). Of course, for some girls the "choo" might actually be very loud and extra feminine, but it still seems fake and unnessasary and comes after an obviously stifled sneeze. The question many of us have always asked is, why do some people stifle and then go out of their way to attract attention to their sneeze by doing the extra "Choo!" at the end.

Well, here's an interesting observation. I have 2 girls in my workplace that both stifle their sneezes by pinching their noses shut, and they sneeze almost silently. The first girl makes a quiet little buildup noise like "Hup...", then the sneeze is totally silent and she just quietly and slowly exhales with no sound. The second girl doesn't make any buildup noise, then she stifles the sneeze itself, and a couple of seconds later just casually says the word "Choo". Sometimes she'll even say something after that like "Oh, my goodness" or "Uhhhh!"

The really interesting thing is that other employees who have witnessed the first girl sneezing (who doesn't say "Choo" after the sneeze) have made comments to her about how she should let her sneezes come out and not hold them in because it can be harmful to do that. Some even asked if that was a sneeze, because it sounded wierd. On the other hand, those same employess have witnessed the second girl sneezing (who says the "Choo" at the end), and none of them have ever said anything to her about not stifling. In fact, I once commented to her about not holding her sneezes in (just to get some reactions) and she claimed that she doesn't hold them in. The same people who had lectured the other girl even agreed with her that she is letting her sneezes out. My point here is that perhaps the extra spoken "Choo" at the end of a stifled sneeze somehow helps to VALIDATE the sneeze. In other words, even though the entire force of the sneeze is really being held in, it makes the sneeze seem more like a regular tradional sneeze. Therefore, it makes the sneezes more acceptable to those who witness them, and the sneezes are less likely to draw negative comments about how holding in sneezes isn't good. Any thoughts on this observation???

I used to work with a woman who did something similiar to what you describe. She wouldn't stifle. She'd loudly go, "Hah-CHOO!" With the "choo" being the louder, more emphasized part of the sneeze.

Some in the office claimed she was doing this for 'effect', to gain 'sympathy' somehow. But I could tell (and I watched her whenever I could---without drawing attention to myself, of course) by her hitched buildup and her post-sneeze sniffling and lip-licking that her sneezes were for real. Lord, I miss her. :winkkiss:

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I must be an idiot.

I've been reading about the spoken "Choo" for ages.

But I just realized that I honestly have no idea what anyone is talking about. I have heard stifles that end in "Choo," and I have always thought that people were exercising control over the explosion part of the sneeze - making it more controlled and quieter - and the result is an inhalation, followed by "Choo," a "Choo" that is quieter, more measured, and more controlled than what would otherwise happen. But I honestly never thought that it was "spoken" after the sneeze was finished. I thought that it was an inevitable part of the sneeze even though it's stifled. I really don't get it at all.

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All I can say is, I wish I worked where you do!

:cryhappy::laugh::laugh:

I guess I've done that. Granted I rarely ever stifle anymore, but when I did, there was usually air that had to escape and it would sometimes come out as a breathy "choo". If that makes any sense. :fury:

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Guest silverbirch

Hi guys

I'm intruiged! I have to confess I just induced a few times to see what this part of my sneeze is like (thought you might like to know :dead: !) And my answer is that if there's a "choo" it is indeed a feirce exhale of breath from stifling the sneeze.

My sneeze seems to be a heh-ISH-ehhh, with the ehh being a breath of air that might sound like a "choo" if the stifle came out heh-ITCH! But yeah I'd NEVER make it an obvious "choo," party because my mum always does it really exaggeratedly and it makes me want to die. :blink: *shudder shudder*

I've found if I try to let the air out silently it always sounds like a groan and draws too much attention in public generally.(Which I'd love love love to hear someone else do! Yes, I'm a hippocrit) Actually I do do it when I'm ill and feeling grim from sneezing so much. Kind of a Heh-ISH- "uuugh, not again..."

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