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Your first language..?


taléya*

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Hello everybody :)

this is my first post at this forum. I hope everything is fine.

I wanted to ask you all - if english is not your mother tongue how do you bless someone in your native language?

It is always interesting to get to know other countries.

In my homeland we have two different ways to bless male or female and the responds are also not the same. It always depends.

You can distinguish it from the last character of the word.

With an "o" or an "a".

Please don't mind if I made some mistakes :)

Have a nice day, taléya** :)

 

 

 

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My native language is Finnish. There's "terveydeksi" (quite literally "for health"). Although I must say I could count the times I've heard it used with my fingers, so it isn't very common to actually say it :P 

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 My native language is spanish. We bless people saying "Salud" (In a sneezing case, it means "Bless you") and we say "Dios te bendiga" (Wich is not for sneezing, and means "God bless you") for just a normal blessing.

 

 Iactuallyhateblessingsomeoneinmylanguage

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Even though I was born in America, my first language was Telugu, which is a South Indian language. Telugu people say, "Chiranjeevi bhava" or something along those lines which roughly translates to "May you live long."

I hate blessing people in both English and Telugu and I never do it.

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10 hours ago, EvaBloom said:

 My native language is spanish. We bless people saying "Salud" (In a sneezing case, it means "Bless you") and we say "Dios te bendiga" (Wich is not for sneezing, and means "God bless you") for just a normal blessing.

 

 Iactuallyhateblessingsomeoneinmylanguage

Olá Eva,

:), yes, I understand "Salud" and "Dios te bendiga". It's fairly same to my language :) 

My first language is portuguese. We say "santinho" for male and "santinha" for female. In some cases you say "Saúde" - it also means ""health".

For normal blessings you can say "Deus te abençoe", which is also often used in Brasil, for example for best wishes when a baby is born.

I can understand you feel uncomfortable to bless someone in your native language, maybe someday you will be fine with it?

Nice to meet you, con cariño, taléya**

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3 hours ago, MeForever said:

In Dutch it's gezondheid, wich also means health. Very close to the German gezündheid.

Back when I was learning Dutch my father-in-law got quite annoyed with me once and corrected my pronunciation of gezondheid because it sounded too German :lol: 

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21 hours ago, helyzelle said:

Back when I was learning Dutch my father-in-law got quite annoyed with me once and corrected my pronunciation of gezondheid because it sounded too German :lol: 

You speak Dutch? That's so cool!

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In French, we say "à tes souhaits" (if you talk to someone you're close to), and "à vos souhaits" if it's someone you're not close to. It means... I don't know how to translate it, maybe "I wish you well"? There is no religious connotation. In fact, I've never heard anyone actually bless someone in French (except at church of course). It's something we don't do, I suppose. Or maybe I just don't know anyone who does it. I find interesting to see how each language have his specific way to react to sneezing, thank you for this thread!

(It reminds me that I reacted quite strongly when someone asked me in Spanish "Estas constipada?" - which means "Do you have a cold?", but in French it looks like you've been asked "Are you constipated?"... :rolleyes:)

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On 26.11.2017 at 7:40 PM, Malachite said:

My native language is Finnish. There's "terveydeksi" (quite literally "for health"). Although I must say I could count the times I've heard it used with my fingers, so it isn't very common to actually say it :P 

Yea blessing others isn't really a custom here... :' )
Only some people do it.
On a side note you'll find a recording of how it's pronounced here.

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11 hours ago, Aliena H. said:

In French, we say "à tes souhaits" (if you talk to someone you're close to), and "à vos souhaits" if it's someone you're not close to. It means... I don't know how to translate it, maybe "I wish you well"? There is no religious connotation. In fact, I've never heard anyone actually bless someone in French (except at church of course). It's something we don't do, I suppose. Or maybe I just don't know anyone who does it. I find interesting to see how each language have his specific way to react to sneezing, thank you for this thread!

(It reminds me that I reacted quite strongly when someone asked me in Spanish "Estas constipada?" - which means "Do you have a cold?", but in French it looks like you've been asked "Are you constipated?"... :rolleyes:)

Hello Aliena H.

Yes, I know "à tes / vos souhaits" - nearly four years ago, I studied french for 3 years in school and we had lessons and a girl in my class had to sneeze once.

She stifled her sneeze silently but our teacher noticed and she took advantage of it to explain for the whole class how you bless someone in french.

She said like you "à tes souhaits" for someone you know and "à vos souhaits" for unknown people.

Our teacher mentioned "Now you can thank me for blessing you. Say "merci" Just try it, try it." :) 

I really felt sorry for this girl, because she tried to sneeze quietly as it was possible and the whole class took attention of her sneeze.

Thanks for your reply and have a nice day:)

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On 26.11.2017 at 7:40 PM, Malachite said:

My native language is Finnish. There's "terveydeksi" (quite literally "for health"). Although I must say I could count the times I've heard it used with my fingers, so it isn't very common to actually say it :P 

I can't believe I forgot to do this in my first reponse&quoting of this post because I always do this even though very few others care about it, lol

Technically terveydeksi doesn't mean "for health" but rather "[may that sneeze] (to) become health". The suffix -ksi means becoming(/turning in to) the thing while the suffix for "for" would be -lle.

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@Malachite and @Sitruuna is it really not used? Don't Finns usually acknowledge a sneeze at all then? One of my best friends here in Belgium is from Finland and she taught me some Finnish words for fun, among them terveydeksi, and she pretty much expects me to use it whenever she sneezes. Is that then more to test my memory of foreign words? Or to do with her always very proper, sort of old-fashioned, etiquette? 

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9 hours ago, helyzelle said:

@Malachite and @Sitruuna is it really not used? Don't Finns usually acknowledge a sneeze at all then? One of my best friends here in Belgium is from Finland and she taught me some Finnish words for fun, among them terveydeksi, and she pretty much expects me to use it whenever she sneezes. Is that then more to test my memory of foreign words? Or to do with her always very proper, sort of old-fashioned, etiquette? 

 

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I just wanted to say that I listened to the Finnish sound clip above and think that "Terveydeksi" is a really cool word.  Its pronunciation sounds almost Russian.

I'm American, so we say "bless you."  However, my ancestors were Italian, and in Italy they say "salute" (similar to the Spanish "salud" = "health").  My grandmother, who was born in Italy, used to alternate it and "bless you."  Here's the pronunciation:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieJBXkw3VBM

 

 

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On 30.11.2017 at 10:36 AM, helyzelle said:

@Malachite and @Sitruuna is it really not used? Don't Finns usually acknowledge a sneeze at all then? One of my best friends here in Belgium is from Finland and she taught me some Finnish words for fun, among them terveydeksi, and she pretty much expects me to use it whenever she sneezes. Is that then more to test my memory of foreign words? Or to do with her always very proper, sort of old-fashioned, etiquette? 

It's really uncommon to aknowledge someone's sneeze. Some people do it and some people do it in certain situations, but blessing someone even if they sneeze in the middle of a conversation is rare.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/27/2017 at 4:02 AM, taléya** said:

Olá Eva,

:), yes, I understand "Salud" and "Dios te bendiga". It's fairly same to my language :) 

My first language is portuguese. We say "santinho" for male and "santinha" for female. In some cases you say "Saúde" - it also means ""health".

For normal blessings you can say "Deus te abençoe", which is also often used in Brasil, for example for best wishes when a baby is born.

I can understand you feel uncomfortable to bless someone in your native language, maybe someday you will be fine with it?

Nice to meet you, con cariño, taléya**

Is there anything close to a fetish community in the Brazilian domain?  I have been learning Portuguese in my free time for a while now, and anything I come up with (granted i am not great, especially with internet slang) mentioning being attracted to sneezing is basically "ew, you need to see a psychologist."  It's depressing! 

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13 hours ago, David said:

Is there anything close to a fetish community in the Brazilian domain?  I have been learning Portuguese in my free time for a while now, and anything I come up with (granted i am not great, especially with internet slang) mentioning being attracted to sneezing is basically "ew, you need to see a psychologist."  It's depressing! 

Hello David,

That's nice :) , as you will know, portuguese from Portugal is a bit different to brazilian portuguese. 

I am sorry, I don't know if there is any community for brazilian domains. 

I can understand that it is depressing for you.

But be sure on the forum you can find some people from Brazil, who knows :)?

Best wishes to you, tudo de bom :)

 

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